The Crocheter’s Art: Nicki Hitz Edson

I am isolated here in a small town with not much of a crochet book collection in the local library. So, I recently requested some crochet books on interlibrary loan, just to see what might be  available. Apparently, here in Tennessee, there is a dearth of books on crochet. But among the few books I was able to obtain was Del Pitt Feldman’s The Crocheter’s Art (Doubleday, 1974). I remember this book from my early research into fiber arts and it is now a classic. A first edition is listed on Amazon for more than $600 dollars! Don’t worry; there is a contemporary paperback available for about $11.00. I daresay, the pictures are not nearly so marvelous as in the original.

This book came at a time when crafts and especially fiber arts were experiencing renewed interest and, for the first time since the Arts and Crafts movement of the early 20th century, fiber arts were being recognized as art and being included in shows in some of the major national galleries. Today, the larger museums still give a nod to crafts with a few select pieces, but major shows are not on the agenda. (Readers, correct me on this one if I am wrong. Are we in a renewal period for textile arts? If you know of any art shows that are currently featuring fiber artists, please post them here. This site is all about making crochet as art more visible and along with that goes any related textile art.)

Some of the artists featured in The Crocheter’s Art are no longer working, but a few are still around and even still actively producing work. I’d like to focus on just one of these artists today. Her name is Nicki Hitz Edson. Some of her best known early work was crocheted masks. She is an artist after my own heart, one of my favorite art forms is maks and my current favorite textile medium is crochet. You can find excellent full color photos of some of these early works at Nicki’s website.(http://www.nickihitzedson.com/index.php-page=crochet.html) My personal favorite is the Satyr. What’s yours?

These masks look as fresh and inspired as they did back in the day when they were first being shown in Tiffany’s windows and the Museum of Contemporary Crafts in New York City. Her mask work continued to be a major part of her art shows throughout the 1970s and then in the 1980s wearable art became the predominant theme in her work. This is not to say her work is limited only to these two ideas. If you browse through the other pages on her website, you will see she also does tapestries and pet portraits, gives workshops in freeform crochet, and sells patterns for some of her original designs for  knitted vests.

I hope looking at Nicki Hitz Edson’s work has given you some inspiration. Has anyone tried a crocheted mask? Maybe there are some of you out there who’ve done some similar work for theatrical costuming. These are not your typical weekend projects for a Halloween costume, but they could be something for one of the big masked balls held around the major cities during the Halloween season. Post a comment, link, or photo of your work or work of someone you admire who’s done some amazing crochet masks!

Happy crocheting!

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