Drafting Patterns for Crochet and Knit Garments

There are few people who make their crochet ideas come to life without a plan and if your plan is to produce a pattern you will need some experience in pattern drafting. I have a background in theatrical costuming and have had to make many, many garments straight from a sketch. But unless it was a very small show, I had to be able to create a pattern that could be easily followed by cutter and seamstress to make my own design or that of another designer come to life. And it had to look like the picture.

The same holds true when creating a crochet or knit garment. It is unlikely that you will find a tech assistant that can or would be willing to create the first draft of a garment from a sketch. You could make the garment up first, but unless you are making something that is a variation on a standard pattern, you will need to draft the garment pattern first. Right now, I have started swatching for a vest idea, but I quickly realized that I need to draft the pattern in order to determine accurately where the stitch pattern needs to change for the proper fit and overall shape of the garment.

You don’t need to take a dressmakers pattern course to do this, but you do need to be able to draft a basic pattern and work from their. I’ll give you a few hints to get you started here and then give you some references for more in-depth instructions at the end.

You will need:

Large paper – at least half the desired circumference of your finished garment

Source options:

Dressmakers paper with large 1″ squares

Butcher paper  or brown wrapping paper – some art stores have it.

Reel ends of newsprint – used to be easily found at newspaper printing offices. Try calling around to any local publications that may still print their own papers.

Large paper scissors – an old pair of Fiskers works nicely

T square – hardware store or art supply store

Soft pencils and erasers – because you are working with cheap quality paper, the pencils and erasers need to be soft enough not to tear the paper.

Compass: for drawing curves

Let’s use a vest for this example. For a first try, let’s use a garment with a fit you already like. Creating the entire garment from scratch can come later, after you have the hang of how to get the basic shape down on paper.

Take the following measurements:

Largest circumference of garment: __________

Divide by 2: __________ = basic front & back width

Divide by 2 again: __________ = center front and back

Length of center back __________

Add at least 3″ top and bottom __________ = approximate length of front and back

Measure across shoulders __________

Distance across shoulder seam at neck __________

Distance from outer shoulder seam and lower armhole seam

__________

First measure the garment for the largest circumference (the entire measurement across front and back). Divide by half, this is your basic front and back size. You’ll see in a moment why we don’t measure each separately. Divide by half again; this mark is your center front and back.

Using front and back width and length draft two large rectangles with 3-6″ of room on all sides. It’s best to cut these into two separate pieces for ease of working with the sheets. Mark each sheet either front or back and mark the center point of each. All other measurements will start from this center point.

Back: Use the shoulder width measurement and center it over your center back. Mark the outer edges of the shoulders on each side. Draw a horizontal line 1″ above the shoulders. Center your ruler or t square and mark the inner neck measurement on the paper.  Use your compass to create a half circle by placing the point into the center back line and opening the compass to meet one of the inner shoulder seam marks and drawing your half circle to meet the other inner neck point. You should have a gentle curve that mimics the curve on your original garment. Take a visual check and see if this looks about right. You could lay the garment out on the paper and trace it but this leads to inaccurate curves because the fabric is not stable like the paper.

Are you confused, yet? You could trace around the entire garment, but then you would have to spend a lot of time truing up all your lines and you wouldn’t learn how the relationship between each line and curve works.

Front: Try taking similar measurents for one armhole. This time draw a rectangle from the top and bottom of the armhole inward to the deepest point on the armhole. Use this rectangle to round off the curve of the armhole, making the bottom curve close to a quarter circle and gently curving up to the outer shoulder seam. If you are familiar with commercial dresspatterns, you will recognize this type of curve. If you don’t sew, just trust me. It’s not and oval, it will create more of an egg shape when joined with the front.

For the front, save time by lightly tracing off the back. Measure across the widest part of the front (this will cross over the bust points if it fits well). Find the waist (in this case the narrowest point of the front. and mark that on your pattern. Be sure each of these marks are the proper distance vertically from the armhole and lower edge. For now, mark that distance and draw a line from the bottom front to the underarm seam, gently curving inward at the waist and then outward to bust line and underarm. You should have one continuous gentle curve. If you have sharp angles, soften your curve. If this means missing your  marks slightly, that’s ok. We are making a fabric that will have more stretch than a woven fabric, so it will ease over the curves.

This is a very simplified explanation and there are a lot more tricks and details that can be added as you gain confidence and skill. But this will give you a basic pattern to work from. You can then lay out a mock up of the stitch pattern in strategic places and discover where your increases and decreases will best be placed. Lily Chin’s book, Couture Crochet gives some good images of how a flat drafted paper patern looks. She actually works out the pattern on paper with the stitch pattern printed on it full size. In order to do this, you would need to go to an office supply store that has a printer used for printing architectural designs and have it printed there. I think it might be too costly for the beginning designer, but it is good to know it is possible.

Happy crocheting!

http://www.lilychinsignaturecollection.com/main.php

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