Crochet in Korean

It wasn’t until moving to Korea that I was inspired to take up crochet for making garments. Korea is very hot and humid in the summer, but it is also a conservative place, so wearing revealing clothing in the summer is frowned upon. The rule at the workplace was no exposed shoulders. If you are American, you already know how hard it is in summer to find appropriate clothing for the work place. With this added restriction I had a dilemma. We were expected to dress in business attire, but how could I look as well kept as my Korean counterparts? I noticed that all of my female coworkers wore little crocheted jackets over their summer tops.

I knew I coudn’t just go out and buy something in my size, but I did know that I could crochet beautiful lacy designs if I could just get some basic patterns. That was the beginning of my adventure with crocheted garments.I started scouring the bookstores and online book sites for crochet patterns that might get me started.

That opened up a whole new world for me. I remembered the wonderful selection of crafts books that the Japanese bookstore, Kinokuniya, back in San Francisco had. They always had a good choice of Japanese craft books in English translations available. Not so, in Korea. But what I did discover was that they have Kyobo Bookstores, which are similar to Kinokuniya. Nothing was in English, but I soon found out that Asian patterns were always charted. I could make the patterns following the charts.

But what would I do if I had a problem? I was thousands of miles away and I had no idea. You can probably guess that I did an internet search and discovered hundreds of crochet sites. There were lots of blogs, as well as commercial sites selling all the supplies, including books and even free patterns.

If I could do it while living in a foreign country where I didn’t speak the language, you can, too.

Here are a few guidelines:

Start with the basics. If you don’t have someone to teach you, find a how-to book that is easy to follow or look at some of the tutorials on YouTube.

Swatch. Make some practice swatches with the most common stitches.

You should learn the chain stitch, single crochet, double crochet, and triple crochet.

You will also need to practice some simple increases and decreases.

Start with a simple pattern, but one you really like. Look for a style you like that uses only one or two different stitches. There should be a list of abbreviations for all the stitches. I recommend getting a book that also has a chart, so you can visualize how the stitches line up.

Choose a good quality yarn in the weight called for in the pattern. If you don’t like the yarn, you won’t like the finished product.

Start with at least three hooks. Get the one called for in the pattern and at least one smaller and one larger hook. Depending on how tightly or loosely you crochet, you may need to use a different hook size.

SWATCH: Remember that yarn that matches the weight called for in the pattern? Well, there is no industry standard, so the yarn size is an estimate. That means the size of your project won’t be right until you play around with the yarn and hooks until you get the gauge called for in the pattern. Make a big swatch, at least 4 inches, preferably larger. Launder it and steam it according to the yarn label, then measure. Keep swatching until you get the right gauge.

What’s gauge: It is an estimate of the number of stitches per inch across a row and the number of rows per inch measuring vertically.

READ: The entire pattern! Try out any confusing parts, like lining up stitches or doing increases and decreases, until you feel confident.

Go for it!

If you get stuck, try finding an answer on an internet blog or an online video. A good place to start is Johnny Vasquez’ video tutorials “New Stitch A Day” There are hundreds of them. Become a member on Ravelry (www.ravelry.com) and post a question on one of the help boards. Or you can contact me by posting a basic question here. This blog is mainly for information and news, but I will be happy to answer specific questions about the basics of getting started with crochet and most likely, others will be able to offer additional information.

Here are some of my favorite websites, blogs, & podcasts: (Dear readers, please suggest more.)

http://newstitchaday.com/welcome

http://www.facebook.com/pages/KINOKUNIYA-BOOKSTORES-SAN-FRANCISCO/177633730285

Kyobo Bookstores online site in Korean only: http://www.kyobobook.co.kr/index.laf?OV_REFFER=http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=kyobo%20bookstore&source=web&cd=1&sqi=2&ved=0CCAQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.kyobobook.co.kr%2F&ei=FyhFUKa2BISB0QHfsIDIDg&usg=AFQjCNFHbRkAJ1H0vtMlDMRZVP9AnxUxUw&sig2=E9pUEthw4QEMgwqrW79z4Q

There is a store in Duluth, Georgia, but no website.

Happy crocheting,

Joy!

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